Sample Timeline

– Imagination to Innovation –

Stages of the DI Problem Solving Process

Week

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

Stage 1

2-4 Weeks

Building your Team/ Understanding the Challenge

Stage 2

2-4 Weeks

Generating and Incubating Ideas/ Research/ Inquiry

Stage 3

2-4 Weeks

Focusing/

Preparing for Action/ Putting It All Together

Stage 4

2-4 Weeks

Ready, Set, GO! Preparing for your Tournament

Stage 5

ENJOY!

THE STARTING POINT: Before Setting Out for your Destination

The Coordinator or Team Manager should:

Obtain membership
Identify Team Managers
Recruit participants
Choose Teams
Hold orientation meeting for parents
Review Challenges
Organize support material, including Instant Challenges

Clues You Can Use: A Close-Up Look at THE STARTING POINT

Clue 1: Make sure your Team is REGISTERED and has a Membership

First things first! Before you can set off with your Team for this year’s “Destination,” you need to you are registered and have a Team Number. If you have not already done so, purchase a membership from ShopDI, Destination Imagination Inc.’s online center for the purchase of all programs and materials (www.shopdi.org). If there is a Coordinator for your program, it might already have been done for you. If not:

  1. Purchase Team Number.
  2. Once your payment has been received and processed, program materials will be mailed to the Contact Person address.
  3. You will then need to activate your membership in DI Online using the activation code sent to you in an email after your ShopDI purchase. DI Online is the system that actually registers and ‘activates’ your membership. It’s easy: Just go to the link in the email and you will receive the “Membership Activation.” It will prompt you through the process.
  4. If you are the person responsible for registering your Team, you will need to know your Team members’ correct names, grades and birthdates, phone numbers, etc. You should collect that information from each Team member ahead of time.
  5. You will receive a unique Team Number once your Team is registered. This number is very important. It will need to be written on all of your Team’s paperwork and Tournament forms.
  6. For more information on registering your Team, see Destination Imagination’s Start a Team.

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Stage 1: Building Your Team & Understandinig the Challenge

Length of this Stage: Approximately 2-4 weeks
Team Time: Approximately 1-2 hours/week

What Happens in this Stage of the Process

The Team (with Team Manager facilitating) should:

  • Learn about the CPS process: Use books and tools* to learn about constructing opportunities, exploring data, and framing problems.
  • Read the challenge and ask: What do we know? What do we need to know?
  • Do Specialties Inventory*, talk about team’s collective and individual strengths
  • Explore some Instant Challenges
  • Do teambuilding activities to learn to work as a team
  • Begin a “To Do” List, and list important dates (such as the Tournament) on a calendar

The Team Manager should:

  • Provide a copy of Challenge and Rules for each Team Member
  • Read Rules of the Road, TM Guide, and Charting Your Course, and check the TM Resource Site*
  • Attend TM Training and/or meetings
  • Plan Meetings
  • At the end of each meeting, debrief. Ask Team: where are we? Are we on track? Do we want to keep moving in this direction? Do we want to change our goal? Are we having fun?

 

Stage 2: Generating: Ideas, Research & Inquiry

Length of this Stage: Approximately 2-5 weeks
Team Time: Approximately 3 hours/week

What Happens in this Stage of the Process

The Team (with Team Manager facilitating) should:

  • Use the CPS Process: Generate Ideas
  • Use reference books, field trips, resource people, etc. to research your solution
  • Request Clarifications if you need them, and check the Clarification site
  • Begin planning your Presentation: think about your performance skills, improvisational skills, practice using different materials creatively, and think about how to incorporate Team Choice Elements.
  • Try different types of Instant Challenges: Task-based, Performance-based, and Combination Challenges
  • Look at Tournament forms: What information will be needed?

The Team Manager should:

  • Re-read Section E of the Team Challenge: “Important Directions for Team Managers”
  • Remind Team, “If it doesn’t say you can’t, then you can.”
  • Arrange field trips to begin to gather materials
  • Update parents on progress; let them know what you need
  • At the end of each meeting, debrief. Ask Team: where are we? Are we on track? Do we want to keep moving in this direction? Do we want to change our goal? Are we having fun?

 

Stage 3: Focusing: Putting your Solution Together

Length of this Stage: Approximately 2-4 weeks
Team Time: Approximately 3-4 hours/week
(with extended time for subgroups & individual sessions)

What Happens in this Stage of the Process

The Team (with Team Manager facilitating) should:

  • Use the CPS Process: Build Acceptance, Develop Solutions, Focus Options, Refine Solutions, Learn Skills
  • Draft and refine scripts
  • Work on costumes and props
  • Improv: Practice with materials
  • Check for any new Clarifications
  • Your Solution: discuss important criteria, time limits, resources, and any improvements to be made
  • Side Trips: Do our Trips show off our team members’ specialties/interests/abilities?
  • Look at the calendar: How are we doing?

The Team Manager should:

  • Check TM Resource site for ideas, help and activities
  • Register the Team for the tournament
  • Register Appraiser(s) and/or Tournament Volunteers
  • Update parents on progress; let them know what you need
  • At the end of each meeting, debrief. Ask Team: where are we? Are we on track? Do we want to keep moving in this direction? Do we want to change our goal? Are we having fun?

 

Stage 4: Ready, Set, GO! Preparing for your Tournament

Length of this Stage: Approximately 2-4 weeks
Team Time: As many hours as it takes to complete the solution and prepare for the Tournament! (Plus extended time for subgroups and individual work sessions)

What Happens in this Stage of the Process

The Team (with Team Manager facilitating) should:

  • Read Travel Guide for Teams with Team (available in the Spring). Pay special attention to Site Procedures and What Ifs sections.
  • Create a Tournment Tool Kit and emergency kit for Presentation Items
  • Rehearse: Practice timing of set up and solution
  • Identify Paperwork Specialist: Fill out paperwork
  • Check Clarification site and discuss new Clarifications
  • Instant Challenge: Continue practicing Instant Challenges under Tournament conditions
  • Showtime! Compete at your Tournament

The Team Manager should:

  • Register for Tournament
  • Receive Tournament information and presentation schedule: Contact Regional/Tournament Director if you have questions
  • Provide copy of Travel Guide for Teams to each team member
  • Arrange for a Dress Rehearsal for parents/schoolother audience
  • At the end of each meeting, debrief. Ask Team: where are we? Are we on track? Do we want to keep moving in this direction? Do we want to change our goal? Are we having fun?
  • Have pre-Tournament meeting with parents. Review tournament schedule, meeting place, interference, and presentation time

 

Stage 5: Celebrate! Look How Far We Have Come on this Journey!

Length of this Stage: Approximately 2-4 weeks
Team Time: A couple of hours during the week following the Tournament

What Happens in this Stage of the Process

The Team AND Team Manager should:

  • Have a party after the Tournament to celebrate bringing this process to a conclusion.
  • Share favorite memories of the funniest moments from the past weeks.
  • Make a list of all the things you have learned that you did not know when you first met as a team.
  • Write thank you notes to resource people who taught the team, Appraisers who represented the team at the Tournament, other supportive people
  • Provide parents with team-generated list of the team’s accomplishments. This will help keep parents’ focus on the benefits of the PROCESS. Remind them that it’s the process, not the product that is important